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View Full Version : June 21, 2011 London Lightning


Itchy
06-22-2011, 02:15 PM
Finally got some lightning shots, these were all in London around midnight

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5144/5860359271_f891e0dd24_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2735/5860934036_69d1cd7222_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3140/5860920214_6e7737575e_b.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5310/5860928890_a58f2c1aa5_b.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5141/5860372259_c1fbda0abe_b.jpg

Deeon
07-02-2011, 09:56 PM
Very nice Pictures i must say :-)
but i have a question for you ( might be a newbie question though ) - how do you take pictures of Lightning Strikes? do you have that fast of a Reaction time on the trigger or pre-snap a shot that might have a chance of a lightning strike?

DarkSky
07-02-2011, 10:38 PM
Very nice Pictures i must say :-)
but i have a question for you ( might be a newbie question though ) - how do you take pictures of Lightning Strikes? do you have that fast of a Reaction time on the trigger or pre-snap a shot that might have a chance of a lightning strike?

You need a camera with an extended shutter time. You *can* use snapshot (non DSLR) cameras, and just set the exposure time to 10sec or 15sec or whatever. But it's better to have a DSLR so you have the Bulb setting (manual exposure) as well as manual focus - as most of the time it will be near pitch black out so if you have an autofocus camera, it wont' have anything to fix on to and your photos will come out all blurred.

Aperature low (f4-9), exposure manual, focus set to infinity, ISO 200. Sometimes 400 (background light dependant). That's basically what I use. You want to use the lowest ISO possible on long exposures because it reduces your hot pixels (pixels on the sensor that go bright during long exposures - all cameras have them).

Tonight I was using f5.6, ISO 400, exposure of 10-15sec.

Oh and of course you MUST have a solid place to mount your camera. Tripod, Ram-mount, etc... no hand-holding for extended exposure times.